At the sign of the golden F. Farah shirts

A sign of quality and strength the Farah shirt has become a style icon of the twentieth century that stills holds its place into the twenty first. The uniform of the Mods and always a popular choice for men everywhere what’s the story behind these Mens designer shirts iconic design? If you’d like a look before we find out there are many examples available at https://www.ejmenswear.com/. Let’s look at the history of these shirts.

 

 

 

 

 

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The family run company began in the 1920’s as Mansour Farah began to produce workwear and general denim items with his wife. This was pretty standard fair catering to the construction and farming community in Texas. There shirts were so well respected that the gained a contract with the US army in the late 1930’s with the advent of World War two this worked well for the company and gave it unprecedented exposure. By this stage Mansour had passed on and the company was being run by his two sons. The shirts supplied to the US army were strong and had wearing but the most interesting thread about them was that they made the soldiers look stylish. This was a fact that was not lost on the British troops who decried the “flashy Yanks” but were also secretly jealous and it was the photogenic Americans who got their pictures taken with the newly liberated Parisian girls shown around the world. The shirts were very practical as well and saw a lot of war use.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The company saw steady growth after the war but with the passing of the older brother James Farah the younger brother William that the fortunes of the company began to take off. Whilst sales in the UK had always been steady, the demobbed Brits now able to buy the shirts and wear them, that the shirts began to seep into the youth cultures of the nineteen sixties and seventies. It was popular with the Mods and skinheads alike but the first real indication that the shirts had made it was when it was picked up by the Rude Boys in Islington. Jamaican sub culture was starting to have an impact on the UK by this point and Reggae and Ska were starting to influence the white musicians as well with the Mods such as The Who and the The Jam being proponents of the style. The image of the Mod or the Skin or the 2Tone Rude Boy in a Farah shirt of suit was soon a staple of the UK fashion world.

The brand is still finding new fans even thought he Mods are now ageing a bit. It remains a relevant style design classic.